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Welcome to Shave 'Em to Save 'Em (SE2)

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    Welcome to Shave 'Em to Save 'Em (SE2)

    Hi all! I asked Our Unraveled to create this subforum so everyone could get on board with this great initiative. The Livestock Conservancy started the Shave 'Em to Save 'Em project to make people aware of heritage breed animals that are in danger of disappearing because breeders need to be connected to customers. If you join the Conservancy for $15, you get a passport and when you buy fleece or roving or yarn, you get a stamp to put in your passport. There are contests, too, and it's a wonderful way to become familiar with different breeds of fiber friends.

    LeoLady is very active in spinning SE2 breeds. If you search her in some of the forums, you'll see some awesome photos.

    Information on the program can be found here:
    https://livestockconservancy.org/ind...d/internal/SE2

    #2
    I just joined the FB group. I don't go on there often. BUT if I buy I will seek out vendors from there. Thanks

    Comment


    • LeoLady
      LeoLady commented
      Editing a comment
      You can go to the website for the Livestock Conservancy. Once you join, you get access to a complete list of the shepherds that are participating in the challenge. So far the hardest fiber to find has been Hog Island. I'm on a list for some next spring.

    • LeoLady
      LeoLady commented
      Editing a comment
      Here is a link to the directory on the Livestock Conservancy web page. You can search just sheep and then tell it to show you only SE2SE fiber providers. If you do that, the map will light up with red arrows. Below the map is a list of the providers, what breed or breeds they have and where they are. Each provides an email address to contact them. https://livestockconservancy.org/ind...ders-directory

    #3
    I signed up! Not sure when or where I'll start, but it will be fun to give it a go!

    Comment


      #4
      YAY!! I found you. Long story short, I lost the notification from JenC about this forum. Hi all. I'm working on my Gulf Coast Native and finished my Florida Cracker. In the bag for the next spin is 4oz of Santa Cruz. I've met some really nice shepherds already and the fiber I've gotten from them has been really nice.

      Comment


      • LeoLady
        LeoLady commented
        Editing a comment
        Sounds to me like spinning dog hair. Inch worm spin works best for dog hair. Sounds like it would work for the Southdown. Rolags will probably also work. I might just skip that one. LOL

      • Carlota
        Carlota commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes, for sure, inchworm too. I did not have a way to make roving at the time, so rolags were my easiest route to take. I have to say that it was very fun to spin the Southdown once I got it carded - the texture was so soft and bouncy.

      • JenC
        JenC commented
        Editing a comment
        Carlota Thanks for the tips! I love rolags and just got a new piece of leather for flicking so I'll try that!

      #5
      Also, I wonder if there would be a benefit to having a group started for SE2SE?

      Comment


      • rkennell
        rkennell commented
        Editing a comment
        JenC, I'm fine with it being this way for now unless we need a way to make different categories under this topic. In hindsight, one of the benefits of having a group is like having your own mini-forum on a certain topic, with sub-forums underneath. For example if you wanted to have a Group for SE2SE, and wanted to have several different threads going, i.e., one for sources of fiber and maybe separate threads for working with different breeds of fiber or maybe one for the logistics, like signing up, claiming prizes, etc., then you could do that. Whereas here they are all in 1 thread and it could get a bit cumbersome after a while. For now, it's not terribly long, but if you'd like to do that,we can. You make the call! I think we will likely do something like this for our next year's Spin de Fleece, to keep it orderly and not so strung out.

      • JenC
        JenC commented
        Editing a comment
        rkennell I think it would be great to have a group with mini-forums. I can see where, otherwise, it could get so crazy. I can't imagine being new to OU, coming into this thread and trying to read endlessly. Way to turn someone off.. lol.

      • rkennell
        rkennell commented
        Editing a comment
        JenC If you would like to go ahead and set up a group, you don't have to ask Admin to do it--just go to the Groups tab, and then click on "Create New Group". It might be good to do that while this topic is relatively new, then create a couple of threads, so the conversation gets going over there and is more organized. If you don't want sole responsibility for it, you can add Group Managers to help you with it.

      #6
      I am pretty excited to see this sub-forum starting. A goal I had when I signed up as a SE2SE "fiber artist" (which cracks me up) was to locate shepherds that I could buy from in my own rather challenging state of Texas. Statistically Texas is a huge fiber-producing state, yet I rarely saw fleeces or spinning fiber for sale anywhere. So I started looking at all the vendors listed on the Livestock Conservancy's online Breeders Directory map within 500 miles of Houston, and I contacted a few of those producers, and started finding some that I could work with to get some fiber. So far, I have corresponded with 3 shepherds and have found them to be helpful and lovely. I have purchased CVM, Leicester Longwool, and Shetland from my home state. That has given me plenty to do while I acquire other breeds. Some Gulf Coast Native, Karakul, and Santa Cruz have also come my way from out of state.

      Some who read this will have seen me flicking away at a charcoal gray Shetland fleece from West Texas during "Spin de Fleece." 4 ounces of spun yarn from that fleece will let me check off that breed, but I will spin a lot more for the future sweater. Since the program lasts for 3 years, I am do not mind having a sweater spin as a side project. It will always be special to me that I will have a sweater totally from Texas.

      As much as possible I will work directly with Texas shepherds, and when I run out of sources in Texas, I will venture out of state. The nice thing is that more and more producers are finding out about the program as we go along, and there are more listings on the map to check out.

      Here is some purchased Karakul roving spindle spun, my first completed 4 ounces. It is the most rustic yarn I have ever handled, and I plan to make a felted tool caddy or pot holder with it.
      Click image for larger version

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      Comment


      • LeoLady
        LeoLady commented
        Editing a comment
        Carlota Welcome! I live in your neighboring state of Louisiana, about 4 miles from the Texas border. Like you, I was intrigued by the challenge, and like you I've met some lovely shepherds through the program. Louisiana does not have a high number of wool producers so I've sort of been all over the country. My project for the challenge is simply to spin, however, my side work is to create an Erin sampler afghan from the finished wool. The biggest surprise for me has been the low cost of the roving or batt. I will, eventually, venture into getting some raw fleece but I need to build up my courage to do that.

      • JenC
        JenC commented
        Editing a comment
        What a great idea to spin from your home state!!! I'm in Maryland, but spent a huge majority of my life in PA. I moved - at the age of 65 - to MD for a job, so I'm crazy in more ways than fiber. I also travel to TX often for my job (Army Corps of Engineers). Listen to me - I I can so easily justify fibers from all these areas. LOL

      #7
      I love hearing what ya'll are doing with your wool. I'm trying to decide if it will be something I can combine all into one project, like an afghan, or if some of it will be too course for that option, but I'd like to get 4 oz of each and get it spun up.

      LeoLady, let's maybe just sit on it for a while and if it looks like a group would be a good thing, we can put one together. We might want to consider doing some sort of SE2SE challenge for spinning (or include knitting, crochet, and weaving since you can purchase the yarn already spun) Anyone want to take that on???

      Comment


      • LeoLady
        LeoLady commented
        Editing a comment
        Works for me. Right now, I'm spinning the SE2SE challenge, starting a KAL with some FB friends and making two unicorns in eggs and 3 dinosaurs in eggs. Maybe after Christmas? Oh, also forgot I've got two dog fur projects that I'm getting ready to start. Yeah, I'm retired.

      • JenC
        JenC commented
        Editing a comment
        I love the idea of an SE2 challenge! I'm in the same place, rkennell, thinking about how to combine it into one project. It was something that LeoLady said that gave me the idea to do a throw made of patches, and I think to have a patch here and there of something that isn't quite skin-soft might not be a problem. If I was going to include it, I'd probaby put it somewhere central in the throw where it wouldn't be getting tucked into neck or feet.

      #8
      Hi LeoLady! And thank you! I think it is nice that you have a project in mind for your future yarns. I agree that the prices are low. One thing I have discovered from processing from scratch is that once the fleece is washed and cleaned of VM and second cuts, the yield can be quite reduced. But this is only an issue for me if I have specific plans for the fleece, such as socks, where I really want to begin the spin with at LEAST 4 ounces of clean and combed fleece. It is going to be fun to hear everyone's experiences as we go along, and to find new favorites.

      Comment


      • LeoLady
        LeoLady commented
        Editing a comment
        I've seen the reduction in following some of the spinners on FB. I'm going to wait till I've completed the challenge, then order, maybe a pound of a raw fleece from one of the providers that skirts and does a basic cleaning.

      • rkennell
        rkennell commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes, speaking from personal experience, having to skirt it from scratch takes a long time and does reduce it quite a bit. I sent my fleece off to a mill to get washed and combed since I wanted it ready to use. I spent quite a few hours picking it over before sending it off and since it was free, I didn't mind spending a little bit (it was around 70 bucks, but I got back probably several pounds worth of washed and combed fleece in a very large box!

      #9
      I just ordered my first 2 breeds--a mix of black and white Jacob and some Lincoln longwool, which I am cringing at, because I have a friend who gave me several fleeces of LL and it's been cleaned and pin drafted into lovely soft roving that will take me forever to use, but I love it! Also, I have a black LL fleece in our basement waiting to be skirted and cleaned as well. Again, it was free, but neither of these were SE2SE shepherds, so I had to order some anyway. Oh well!

      Comment


      • rkennell
        rkennell commented
        Editing a comment
        @Carlota--definitely!

      • JenC
        JenC commented
        Editing a comment
        We need the ability to like/love comments :-)

      • LeoLady
        LeoLady commented
        Editing a comment
        JenC YES!!

      #10
      rkennell if you could see my sewing room, you'd wonder why in the world I'd want to make more yarn. When my mom passed, I inherited all her yarn and she was a yarn hoarder. She bought high quality yarn by the box and stored it for 'when she would need it" But I love to spin so here I am, adding to the stash. LOL

      Comment


      • LeoLady
        LeoLady commented
        Editing a comment
        JenC How kind! I'll PM you his address as soon as I get it. He's finally found an apartment and I neglected to get the address so I'll get it tomorrow and pm it to you. I think size 8 needles and worsted weight yarn for now for him. Till he learns.

      • rkennell
        rkennell commented
        Editing a comment
        JenC, that is so kind of you! I'll ask her if she'd like to increase her stash--she's on a somewhat limited budget right now, so I'll see if she'd like some sizes.

      • JenC
        JenC commented
        Editing a comment
        YAY! I see some destashing in my near future. What a relief!

      #11
      How neat

      Comment


        #12
        Good evening all. Mighty quiet today. I took the day off from spinning, first since the beginning of the SdF. Instead I worked on the unicorn in the egg and managed to cast on my KAL project.

        Comment


        • JenC
          JenC commented
          Editing a comment
          what on earth is the unicorn in the egg???

        • LeoLady
          LeoLady commented
          Editing a comment
          Sayens Crochet has the pattern. It's a crochet unicorn that is about 5" tall inside a crocheted egg. I'll post a picture here when I finish it.

        • JenC
          JenC commented
          Editing a comment
          Sounds sweet!!

        #13
        Note to self: Do NOT store roving, batt or top in a bag that has even a small Velcro closer. (SIGH) Fortunately, I didn't lose any fiber but it was a close call. LOL

        Comment


        • LeoLady
          LeoLady commented
          Editing a comment
          rkennell I realized it as i pulled the last batt out of the bag and it caught. I froze, carefully picked up the bag and every so gentle removed the wool from the Velcro. Won't do that again. LOL

        • rkennell
          rkennell commented
          Editing a comment
          Wow, having a bag with Velcro would be a challenge! Glad you got it and thanks for sharing so the rest of us don't make the same mistake if we happen to have a bag like that.

        • JenC
          JenC commented
          Editing a comment
          oh my!!! I would be freaking out! I'm glad it all turned out well!

        #14
        Some Horned Dorset combed top (with sticker!) is on its way, earmarked as my fall sock spin. The plan is to spin the fiber first, and then to go for a tonal dye with natural dyes. Then maybe I will knit a classic cabled sock, but not too complicated. This is like an all-day sucker; I will have time to savor the prospects. It seems like I can get a lot of mileage out of this acquisition, though I am a little late for the sock KAL as it takes a while to spin for socks.

        Comment


        • JenC
          JenC commented
          Editing a comment
          All day sucker - love it!! Can yu tell a newb spinner what is different about spinning for socks? I'm just starting to spindle spinn some fiber that was intentioned for socks, and I'm not sure what I should be doing differently, if anything.

        • Carlota
          Carlota commented
          Editing a comment
          JenC Well I am an old pro having spun exactly one skein of sock yarn and there is still so much to learn. The main thing with sock yarn is that you want it as fine as you can manage, as many plies as you can manage, as smooth as possible (i.e., worsted-spun rather than woolen-spun), and generally you want sturdy fibers (longer rather than shorter), with plenty of twist in the plying. The latest issue of PLY magazine on Socks has some guidelines and then many ways to deviate from them. I am still at the stage of trying to spin consistent singles that will ply up as fingering weight, which means singles between 32-45 wpi. If I were doing this on a spindle, I would want my lightest weight drop spindle rather than my supported spindle (which would give me a fuzzier, less tucked-in thread). Of course any of what I said can be debated but this is my path for now. I hope that helps. I was shocked how hard it was to find enough info to get me in the ballpark when I started this last fall. But now a lot of things have come out. You might look at the Sheepspot Podcast episodes 40-43 as a good starting point. https://www.sheepspot.com/podcast

        • JenC
          JenC commented
          Editing a comment
          I am really looking forward to be able to do this sometime. I have a ways to go before smooth and consistent is in descriptions of my fiber. I get PLY so I'll have to check that issue out.

        #15
        Happy to see this topic. I worked on spinning SE2SE fibers during Spin De Fleece and completed Hog Island, Cotswold, Leicester Longwool. I started working on Romeldale/CVM and am really loving it.

        Comment


        • JenC
          JenC commented
          Editing a comment
          strawberryroan, who did your purchase from and are all thumbs up? any thumbs down?

          I bought some Southdown recently from Belle Fourche and I loooooove the smell, clean and sheepy, there's barely any vm and what's there is super easy to pick out (so it's not like burrs). The staple is short, which I understand is typical of Southdown. This isn't something I've had to face, so it's a new learning curve for me. The only complaint (not for me but maybe for others) I would have (and I don't know if it is a processing issue or just typical of Southdown) is that it is kind of neppy. In a 2" draft, there are probably 8 noils. I know a lot of people see this as a deal-breaker. I, personally, see this as something that is just a "here it is, now how do you use it." I love heatherered, textured, nubby fibers, so noils/nepps, aren't something that make me crazy, but for someone who is looking to spin something consistent to the point of manufactured, this might not be the fiber of choice.

        • strawberryroan
          strawberryroan commented
          Editing a comment
          JenC these are the fibers I've spun so far.
          Hog Island - The Ross Farm thumbs up;
          Cotswold - K Miller - thumbs up for the fiber - this one was challenging to spin, it was difficult to draft;
          Leicester Longwool - Belle Forche Farm/Antique Sheep - thumbs up, my favorite until I began the CVM
          CMV - E Sakornbut/Fiber Curio thumbs up, I'm loving this fiber!

        • JenC
          JenC commented
          Editing a comment
          I think LL will be my next purchase!
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