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Questions About Yarn

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  • Reneelmt
    commented on 's reply
    I like Premier Home Cotton, it has a bit of polyester which helps it retain color and shape. Dishie from KP is also very nice and keeps it's color. If you want something softer for face cloths, KP's cot-lin or shine are great choices.

  • Char
    commented on 's reply
    The Hobby Lobby “I love this cotton”. Is my favorite. :-)

  • lovestostitch
    commented on 's reply
    If you want to make them some potholders, I made up a pattern for pocket potholders - the kind you put your hand in. It's in Fiberkind's Marketplace in the free crochet patterns. I think that cotton makes the best potholders. I've washed mine many times and they still look great.

  • FreedomLover
    commented on 's reply
    Congratulations to your family! I'm not familiar with Lion Brand cotton so I can't speak to that, I also like Hobby Lobby cotton and Lily Sugar and Cream. I've made several dishcloths with Lily and they last for years.

  • lovestostitch
    commented on 's reply
    I really like Lily Sugar and Cream. It is 100% cotton. I've used it for dishcloths and potholders and it washes up beautifully.

  • Timeflies
    replied
    I like to knit/crochet dishcloths and towels as a bridal shower gift. I have used the cheaper kind of cotton yarn, but after washing/drying it, it gets hard. I have purchased Hobby Lobby cotton yarn also, which is a bit better. I have Lion Brand cotton yarn that I planned to knit a sweater of some kind. But a knitting friend didn’t think I would like it.
    What type of cotton yarn would you recommend, that would be soft even after washing/drying it? But also would be absorbent while using it. My oldest grandchild is getting married, and I would like to make a set or two for them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Char
    commented on 's reply
    runner5 - I do the same thing - when traveling it is like a souvenir. Then I knit it up and I wear the souvenir bringing back fun memories!

  • annekepoot
    commented on 's reply
    And if you're winding by hand, I always follow my grandmother's example - she would hold the ball with two fingers on top and wind the yarn around her fingers so that there was some room between the layers of yarn. After about ten winds she would twist the ball around so that the yarn landed on another part of the ball and begin again.

  • wheat
    commented on 's reply
    Edie ECkman has an excellent tutorial at:
    https://www.edieeckman.com/2019/05/0...-swift-winder/
    Last edited by wheat; 08-23-2019, 11:02 AM.

  • greyart
    replied
    thanks, I already have a ball winder so I think I will get a swift as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • wheat
    commented on 's reply
    Never allow anyone to take away your joy in your makings. My advice is to use the best quality you can afford, so no guilt that you are taking away from your family - but that still gives you pleasure

    Sometimes this means I can only afford few projects, but at least I am sure I will enjoy the making

    And, FWIW there are "affordable" yarn store yarns, you just need to take the time to compare the price per yard
    Yes, I try to support Indie dyers whenever possible, but sometimes the price/value of something from KFI's Ella Rae line is exactly what I want/need for the particular project.

  • wheat
    commented on 's reply
    There are a number of different data base type projects in progress - at the moment "Stash" is at the top of the pile based on member "demand"

    I am not familiar with that brand, but would never base my assumptions on a particular fiber based on a single brand. It sounds like that particular brand was not properly spun (and cashmere, because it is so fine a fleece does need special attention) AND was not properly set during the dyeing process.

  • wheat
    replied
    Perhaps this chart would be helpful.
    https://itsalljuststring.com/index.p...age=page&id=11

    Leave a comment:


  • EllenDeKnitter
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, greyart, you need to wind the hank into a ball before you start or you'll end up with an awful mess. These days I use a swift, but for the first 30 years I knitter, I didn't own one.

    If you have a person who will do your bidding, you can open the hank and hang it around your helpers hands - their job is to keep the hank open as you wind the ball.

    Alternately, you can open the hank and hang it on the back of 2 ladder back chairs or even one if you're very careful.

    The idea is to open up the circle of yarn, make sure it's not twisted in any way (I stick my thumbs in it and pull it apart to try and straighten it up), then very carefully cut the strings that hold it together. Some people untie those strings, but I find that if I cut super carefully immediately beside the knots then I'm okay. As you do this you'll find the yarn ends. I generally find that one end seems to be on top and that's the one I use to make my ball. I prefer center pull balls for everything except lace weight yarn, but that's just personal preference.

  • ilexedits
    replied
    greyart, some people loop the opened hank over their knees while they work from it, then when they need to stop, they re-twist it back into a skein.

    I am WAY too much of a klutz to do that, so I wind it into a ball. There's no need to buy either a swift, which holds the open hank under tension and spins while you wind off the yarn, or a ball winder. I've used two dining room chairs back to back, with the hank draped over them then spread apart to hold it under slight tension, instead of a swift. Some people wind around a nostepinne, which is often a somewhat fancy turned dowel, while others use the handle of a wooden spoon or even their thumb.

    I prefer my swift and Nancy Knit Knacks ball winder, but they really aren't necessary. Well, maybe if you're dealing with thousand-yard hanks of laceweight!!

    Whichever way you wind the yarn into a ball, keep it loose and fluffy. It should squish agreeably. My swift doesn't turn as freely as I would like, so I always re-wind the somewhat tight initial ball made from my swift. I also don't wind the yarn until I'm ready to use it. I use to wind it as soon as I bought it, but then I'd lose the label, or change my mind about keeping it, or what have you, so if you think you might ever need to de-stash, it's better for it to remain in a hank.

    Leave a comment:

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