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2021 Reading Challenge πŸ“š

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    18. The Last Chamber...Ernest Dempsey ~ Travel Adventure 5/5
    Debbie

    Stashbusting MAL WTD 0/YTD -178 (2020-712)(2019-642)(2018-109)
    Book Challenge 18/30 (2020-55)(2019-51)(2018-35)

    I've come to the conclusion that collecting yarn, and using yarn are two entirely separate hobbies.
    Crochet Is My Yoga

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      45: The Last Kingdom by Bernard Cornwell. Historical adventure set in Anglo-Saxon days - heavy on the battles but a good read. 4/5.
      46: The Inugami Curse by Seishi Yokomizo. Japanese mystery from the post WWII era. Odd, graphic, but interesting. 3/5

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        47: Towards Zero by Agatha Christie. A Superintendent Battle mystery, and one of her best imo. 5/5

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          84 Malice in Miniature; Jeanne M. Dams
          85 Ezra ; commentary by Thomas Bolin nf 22
          86 To Perish in Penzance; Jeanne M Dams
          87 Sins out of School
          88 Winter of Discontent; Jeanne M Dams
          Last edited by crosstitchlinda; 05-30-2021, 01:43 PM. Reason: Spelling
          Linda
          2021 Stasbusting week ending 6/19 WTD = +0 YTD = +86
          2020 Stash busted +160
          Book Challenge 91/100; 24 non-fiction


          "All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost.
          The Old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost" JRR Tolkien

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            48: The Murder at the Manchester Museum by Jim Eldridge. Mystery set in late Victorian era. Bit formulaic, I thought. 2/5

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              49: The Face in the Abyss by AA Merritt. Pulp fantasy, and I really am wondering why I bother with these - the Kindle collection only cost me 49p, and my time is worth more than that. 1/5.

              Comment


              • annekepoot
                annekepoot commented
                Editing a comment
                Lemming13 - It's the mind's struggle between "I always finish what I start" ethic and the "This is a waste of my valuable time" when we could be doing other things.

              • Lemming13
                Lemming13 commented
                Editing a comment
                You're so right, annekepoot; I do hate giving up. But sometimes we really do have to.

              A Train in Winter by Caroline Moorehead. A deeply disturbing book about 230 French resistance women during World War II. The book describes their activities during the war and their eventual capture and detention in Auschwitz and Birkenau, and the inability to return to "normal" life for the remaining 29 survivors after the war. It beggars the imagination of the despicable and inhumane actions of the Nazis and their collaborators, and the atrocities committed in the concentration camps. I don't think we truly understand the heinousness and evil which occurred there. It's fortunate that God says "vengeance is Mine and I will repay" because I can't say in a polite forum what I would have done to those people. An excellent read for those who want to understand what happened and to see the amazing courage of these young women in the face of incredible torture. The author has a short description of what happened to all 230 in the appendix.
              Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. Ian Maclaren (misattributed to Plato)

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              • Pegg Thomas
                Pegg Thomas commented
                Editing a comment
                I'm not sure I could read this. On the one hand, I'd like to know what they went through. On the other hand, I don't want to let that level of evil into my mind.

              • annekepoot
                annekepoot commented
                Editing a comment
                Pegg Thomas - I totally understand what you are saying and there are some things you really don't want to know, but on the other hand, if people don't know what truly happened, then it is so easy for history to repeat itself or as some say, to think that it never happened. My interest comes mainly from the reminiscences from my father, who was in his mid-teens during the war in Holland and how his Jewish teachers and friends "disappeared" never to be seen again, and he remembers how immediately after the war he would see women with shaved heads - those who had been a little too friendly with the occupiers. He describes going with his brother on their bikes to outlying farms to beg for food and being shot at by Nazis on their trip home because they weren't allowed to have bicycles. My mother survived the near total bombardment of Rotterdam. From the internet "Almost the entire historic city centre was destroyed, nearly 900 people were killed and 85,000 more were left homeless. The psychological and physical success of the raid, from the German perspective, led the Oberkommando der Luftwaffe (OKL) to threaten to destroy the city of Utrecht if the Dutch command did not surrender. The Dutch surrendered in the late afternoon of 14 May, signing the capitulation early the next morning." Dad had his identity card forged to show him as younger so he wouldn't be sent to German work camps. He had an uncle who went underground to avoid the work camps, grandma had a brother who went MIA and never found out what happened to him. So yes, I read these stories to come to grips with what my parents experienced.

              • Pegg Thomas
                Pegg Thomas commented
                Editing a comment
                annekepoot, I get it. What I meant was the vivid details, that's what I don't really want to read. The history I know - the big picture history. That's plenty evil right there. But the personal, vivid details I shy away from. Not because I don't believe them, but because I don't need that in my head. I don't know if that makes sense or not, but that's where I am.

              89 Nehemiah; commentary by Thomas Bolin Non Fiction 23
              90 A Dark and Stormy Night, Jeanne M. Dams -- this is a nod to Agatha Christie's And then there were None. A fun read.
              Linda
              2021 Stasbusting week ending 6/19 WTD = +0 YTD = +86
              2020 Stash busted +160
              Book Challenge 91/100; 24 non-fiction


              "All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost.
              The Old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost" JRR Tolkien

              Comment


                50: Cheri & The Last of Cheri by Colette. Concerns the life of a French gigolo before and after WWI. Interesting read but I wouldn't re-read it. 3/5

                Comment


                  #19 - Journey to ChiYah by Kimberly Russell (releases in July)

                  Let me say upfront, if you assumed from the title that this book is a fantasy about an alternate China, it’s not. Yeah. That threw me too.

                  Journey to ChiYah is an allegory, like a modern-day Pilgrim’s Progress. Admittedly, not my normal type of read. (But – yes – I do occasionally climb out of history long enough to read something else.)

                  This is a self-published book, and having read a number of those, I have to say that this one is a cut above most. It held my interest throughout, there was a full character arc to the story, and ended with a solid finish.

                  The main character, Jade, is thrown into a journey and takes the reader along with her. It’s an important journey, one every Christian should be able to identify with, and one non-Christians may wish to explore.

                  I can recommend this book to people who enjoy allegories, to Christians who can identify with a spiritual journey, and to those who are seeking a bigger picture or greater meaning in their lives.
                  Spinner of Yarns
                  Author and Fiber Artist
                  Subscribe to my monthly newsletter: https://www.subscribepage.com/PeggThomas

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                    21. Monk's Hood by Ellis Peters 4/5
                    22. A Body in the Transcript by Jeanne M. Dams 4/5
                    23. Code of Valor by Lynette Eason 5/5 (Christian Author)
                    Book Challenge 23/50
                    2021 stash busting WTD. o YTD. 6

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                      51: A Bespoke Murder by Edward Marston. Mystery set in WWI, and the first thing by this author I actually disliked. 1/5

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                        A Time of Departing by Ray Yungren - "Ancient mystical practices are being introduced into countless churches under the umbrella of the spiritual formation movement." Yungren paints a compelling picture of the dangers of "Christian" mysticism and its effects on the church and the individual believer.
                        Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. Ian Maclaren (misattributed to Plato)

                        Comment


                          52: Poirot Investigates by Agatha Christie. Classic detective short stories. 4/5

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                            It's been quiet here - everyone must be in the garden!
                            Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. Ian Maclaren (misattributed to Plato)

                            Comment


                            • hereami
                              hereami commented
                              Editing a comment
                              I have been doing some garden work. In another day or so I should have some ripe tomatoes.
                              I have plans to take a few sweet Tea and book reading breaks this week as our temperatures are projected to climb up to and over 100degrees Fahrenheit.

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